Have we oversold the India story ?


Indian Economy From Aviation, Retail , Healthcare & SEZ Perspective

A lot of experts spoke about the robustness of the Indian economy when the global recession of 2008 did not entirely slow down India’s growth. Experts spoke at length about the pragmatism of India’s central bank leadership and its policies to have evaded the crisis. They even spoke about the sturdiness of the capital market and the role of the regulatory authority.  Today the global crisis is over in most of the nations. United States is back on track with the unemployment figures at a controllable rate and the retail spending picking up. Similarly Japan is expecting the return on investments it made after the Tsunami crisis last year. The amount spent on reconstruction has boosted the economy and it is expected to grow at respectable 2 percent this year. Only Europe seems to be lagging behind, however it must be taken into account that integrating economies of over 30 nations is a daunting task and credit has to be given to EU’s leadership for having dealt with the crisis in a respectable manner.

When compared to the growth rates of these developed nations India’s 7.6 percent growth rate seems to be enviable. So is everything great with the Indian economy? Is it really faring the way it is being projected? Every year fiscal consolidation is the buzzword yet the budget keeps running into deficit. The finance minister keeps promising to bring it under control yet deficit has increased from 4.6 percent last fiscal to 5.9 percent this fiscal year. Most of the deficit is on the account of food, fuel and fertilizer subsidies. The government keeps making provisions for the underprivileged but it is equally true that they are not getting the desired benefits. Most of the provisions are limited to mike & paper.

Let us evaluate the top most (so-called Sunrise )  sectors in India that are consumer driven and how they are faring – Retail , Healthcare , Aviation and also the ‘Oversold & over hyped SEZ story’.

We will have a moment of truth !

Aviation Industry

The India Aviation industry is in a tailspin. Every other day Air India, Kingfisher, Jet Airways etc are making the headlines for all the wrong reason.

Air India the state-owned company has been relying on frequent government bailouts for its existence. Air India alone was responsible for the 10 percent of the global aviation industry losses in the year 2008 while it handled dismal 0.35 percent of the global passenger traffic.  It is also over staffed with over 500 employees per aircraft whereas the industry average is around 120.

Kingfisher airlines owned by the flamboyant liquor baron Vijay Mallya is in troubles. Banks have finally decided to withdraw support in terms of providing further debt.  The only hope which the country’s third largest carrier can have right now is a government bailout. However there is a vehement opposition to such an action by the government. Experts and other industrial groups have strongly advised against such an action as it is a free market economy and it would amount to sheer wastage of taxpayers’ money.

Jet Airways has recently been in news when the tax authorities decided to freeze its account as it was about to default on its service tax payments. The Jet Airways spokesperson attributed the problem to rising crude oil prices and the high airport duties and lack of support from government in terms of policies. According to them the delay in service tax payment was a minor operational issue. However the mounting losses over past few years tell an entirely different story.  They were in news few years back for having laid off over 1200 employees and later taking them back next day after intervention from a local politician.

Other airlines in India like Spice jet, Go Air etc. have been on the fringe and have been moving back and forth from black to red.  An only Indigo airline is making profits. Several other have bowed down under pressure. They were either forced to shut down operations like Paramount Airlines or they managed to exit at the right time like Air Deccan and Sahara Airlines.

So what exactly is ailing the airlines in India?  Rising crude oil prices are often quoted as the culprit. In India fuel cost is almost 40 percent of the operational cost of running an airline whereas in other countries it remains around 15 percent. High fuels cost give little margin to maneuver in terms of other aspects like offering attractive tickets rates and other offers. However this is not the entire picture. Even though the crude prices reduced from $ 156 barrel to $70 barrel in 2008 to 2009, the Indian carriers continued to bleed and posted losses.

The real problem is of excess capacity due to overselling of India’s growth story . India’s daily domestic passenger traffic is approximately 1.51 lakh passengers whereas the capacity is around 2.16 lakh passengers. Imagine the revenue loss everyday on account of unused capacity. This has happened only due to the mindless unplanned expansion by the airlines hoping to cash on the Indian Incorporation growth story sold by the gang of politicians right from Sonia , Manmohan & inefficient Pranab and highly promoted Montek !  The airlines promoters were chasing numbers which was arrived on mere speculation & playing a ‘Valuation game to make quick buck’. They went on buying spree and expanded their fleet. Today the aircrafts remain underutilized.  India has the aircraft flying hours of 12 per day compared to 16 per day internationally.

Looking at the complete picture it is difficult fix the responsibility on the airline owners. They are capitalists who are driven by market forces. They anticipated growth in market based on market forecasts and other factors like projected rate of growth of GDP. They expected growth in industrial output and service industry output and subsequent increase in airline travel. However the reality was far removed from it. The India Incorporation failed to deliver and they were left in lurch. Today they are hoping for a miracle to save them from their predicament.

Losses Made by Major Domestic Carriers in India

Carrier Cumulative Loss 3 years (Cr)
Air India 13,000
Kingfisher Airlines 3900
Jet Airways 2400

Retail Industry

According to the experts the retail trade industry in India is having a bright future & is consumption driven due to the ‘reducing poverty due to social schemes and increasing middle class due to India’s growth story ‘. One of the studies by North bride capital expects it reach about USD 850 billion by 2012. Out of which organised retail will be having a share of over 20 percent. In numbers it over USD 175 billion. That is a huge market. According to others this figure will be achieved by 2015. Similarly other reports have painted rosy picture for the entire industry.  Currently it is increasing at a rate of 5% yearly.  A further increase of 7-8% is expected in the industry of retail in India by growth in consumerism in urban areas, rising incomes, and a steep rise in rural consumption.

As per consulting firm KPMG’s findings in a March 2009 report, the organised retail market in India has witnessed steady growth at 15 per cent in fiscal 2009. It will grow much faster, at the rate of 30-35 per cent annually, than the traditional one in the coming years. Fast moving consumer goods (FMCG) and apparel sectors are likely to drive this growth.

According to the 8th Annual Global Retail Development Index (GRDI) of AT Kearney, India retail industry is the most promising emerging market for investment. In 2007, the retail trade in India had a share of 8-10% in the GDP (Gross Domestic Product) of the country. In 2009, it rose to 12%. It is also expected to reach 22% by 2010.

A India’s Retail Market Report by Boston Consulting Group

Year

Total Size ($ Billions)

Organised Retail ($ Billions)

Percentage

2005

244

8

3

2006

276

11

4

2007

316

15

5

2008

362

19

5

2009

368

22

6

2010

425

28

7

2011

471

35

7

2012*

528

44

8

2013*

590

55

9

*Forecast

 

The true story of the retail industry: It has become a ‘Valuation game’ due to over selling the India story of the growing middle class 

Subhiksha, Vishal Mega Mart, Koutons , Wadhawan group’s Spinach etc; do these names sound familiar and have something in common. Yes these are players in the organised retail industry who have succumbed and failed to deliver at their promoters expectations. These chain stores were at one time case studies of India’s organised retail success. So what actually forced them lower their shutters.   

According to Jagannadham Thunuguntla, head of SMC Global all these cases are classic examples of the retailers getting carried away by the India’s fascinating growth story and the phenomenal rise of the middle class.

The phenomenon is not limited with these cases mentioned above but also with the so-called successful ones in the industry. Country’s largest department store Shoppers Stop for instance posted an overall loss of Rs.4 crore in the last five years, while its debt soared to Rs.390 crore. The Tata group’s retail arm, Trent decided to close down its loss making chain, Fashion Yatra. It was launched in Oct 2008 and it was aiming at low-income shoppers in Tier 2 – 4 towns. Similarly Reliance Retail decided to close its Reliance Wellness format and not only that it scaled its hypermarket format down in some cities. Hypercity closed down its catalogue selling venture and also got rid of its Gourmet City format.

For the modern retailers penetrating further into urban markets has become a challenge. They have no option but to continue to create, preserve and then destroy the store formats they have come up with. Having closed down and revived several formats, most retailers have realised they need to constantly experiment with them to stay afloat.

So we can clearly see that India’s organised retail industry, which has the coveted potential of nearly a billion plus customers with enough cash to spare, has so far claimed a number of players, small and large. These players expanded too soon based on mere speculations.

While these retail stores were expanding and accumulating debts they hoped that the middle class with disposable income would be ready in short time to support them.  Things did not turn out the way they had planned. India Incorporation failed to deliver and along with that came the global economic crisis. These firms ultimately paid the price by closing down their shutters. For instance Subhiksha had expanded to over 1600 stores country-wide entirely on debt. This was a blunder that it committed as it was counting on the rising customer demand which was only on papers.

Not only the growth stories are misleading, at the same time the country’s back-end is not developed and huge investments go into developing it.  The vital supply chain required for the retail networks are entirely missing. This leads to a huge inventory cost which the small retailers are unable to cope up with. Take for example, it is estimated that in the food retail business in India, the wastage due to lack of proper storage facility is staggering 40%. This entire situation is largely the result of the lack of proper policy framework from the government.

The Indian retailers like Future group , Reliance and others are backing FDI so that they can get investment and save themselves from the fate of Subhiksha , Koutons , Gini & Jony , Spkykar , Vishal Mega mart , Foodland super markets, Surya Group etc . We have more companies going into CDR – Corporate debt re-structuring post the closure of the financial year 2011 ( March 2012 ). Banks do not wish to announce the failures or NPA’s in this year.

Ideally , retail businesses should have been making money due to consumer demand but the fact remains that India’s income and growth story is limited only to 6-10 towns and impacts less than 10 % of India’s population

 SEZ’s in India

India adopted the concept of zones from as early as 1965. Kandla in Gujarat was the first Asian export processing zone till the advent of the modern SEZ’s as such zones are now known as. With the passing of the SEZ Act in 2005, it was hoped that the Chinese success story would be replicated in India. It was expected that investor’s confidence would be established in the Government’s commitment to a stable policy regime. The real aim was to generate greater economic activity and employment with the establishment of SEZ’s following the Chinese model of economic growth !

There were numerous applications from multiple sources with individuals, indigenous companies, foreign MNC’s all rushing to have a share in the pie. Sadly it was a short phenomenon. The initial excitement was over as the problems started cropping up. Today in the last two years, as many as 60 applications for SEZs have been withdrawn, while 35 developers have applied for de-notification, according to data by CB Richard Ellis (CBRE), the real estate consultants.

Till date, the government has approved 584 SEZs. There are 381 notified SEZs, of which 148 are operational. Of these 148, only 17 are multiproduct SEZs. The remaining ones are SEZs dealing in engineering, electronics, IT/ITeS, hardware, textiles, bio-technology and gems & jewellery.

So what exactly is wrong with the SEZ idea in India which paid its dividends in China, Poland and Philippines?

On the whole the SEZ idea in India seems to be very much the product of the irrational expectation which has been fueled by imagination.

Healthcare Companies :  Most of the healthcare companies are ‘managing profits’ and as i write , a major healthcare ( hospital ) chain and a pharmaceutical conglomerate is about to wind up in the next 3 months . Imagine a healthcare & hospital company winding up ?

So the Congress party has sold the India story purely on ‘Imaginative basis and on speculative data’ numbers , have no idea of what is fueling inflation and what will deliver growth ? With all sunrise sectors on a downslide , it is better to replace these ‘ignorant intellectuals’ and bring in people who can understand the economy and run it efficiently .

Based on the governments high-octane pitches for the India’s growth story , consulting companies have brought out reports supporting government announcements , and  business houses have approached investors or moved to stock market and raised money and have put up expansion plans . But the reality is that, India does not have a growth story with the current fundamentals being very weak and ‘Leaky’ social schemes are making the party rich and not the population !

Also,  that the current stand of the government to raise the tax issue with Vodafone is a clear proof of what i am writing . India is desperate for funds and behaving like a dictator reversing a five decade legislation for just 10,000 crore ( USD 2 billion ). Does it not show the lack of morality and desperation for funds ? Rest will become apparent in April – May-June Quarter !

Lastly , the financial deficit of the government proves the rest ; all is not well with the India ‘bubble’ story ! Tough times are ahead , if we don’t take immediate action !

Rajendra Pratap Gupta

Healthcare I Retail I Rural Economy I Public Policy

www.commonmansblog.com

Contract workers in NRHM & Exclusion of Wine under FSSAI


 Rajendra Pratap Gupta

President & Member

Board of Directors

March 11, 2012.

Shri Ghulam Nabi Azad

Union Minister for Health & Family Welfare

Government of India.

Nirman Bhawan, New Delhi – 110108.

Reference : Contract Employees under NRHM & Exclusion of Wine from FSSAI

Dear Shri Azad ji,

In the above quoted reference , I wish to draw your attention to the above mentioned two important issues .

Firstly, the status of contract employees under the NRHM: Over the last few months, I have got thousands of emails on my blog about the future of employees working under NRHM.  People have been asking me about their future after putting in 10-15 years under NRHM? The people fear that if their services are terminated after March 2017 (when the 12th five year plan ends), people would have become over aged for the government jobs and their careers would be ruined!

It is expected that the government will either regularize these workers in the 12th five-year plan or work out the proportionate payments as pensions for the number of years put in service of 15 years and above. Also, it would be great if the services of these contract workers are regularized with deliverables fixed for each worker / cadre

FSSAI (Food Safety & Standards Authority of India). It is learned from the FSSAI workshops that, ‘Wine’ has been included under FSSAI. It is an unexpected and an unfortunate step for India. We are not sure what kind of ‘message’ is the government giving to 100’s of million youths of this country by putting ‘Wine’ under Food Safety & Standards Authority of India (FSSAI )? Does it imply that consumption of wine is now being considered safe and recommended for consumption by the Indian population ? or is it the handiwork of some foreign lobby groups? Hoping that the corrective steps would be taken immediately.

Appropriate actions should be initiated post the discussion with the stake holders

Yours truly,

Rajendra Pratap Gupta

CC:

Dr.Manmohan Singh, Prime Minister, GOI

Mr.Pranab Mukherjee, Finance Minister, GOI

Mr.P.Chidambaram, Home Minister, GOI

Mr.Sharad Pawar, Union Minister for Agriculture, GOI.

Shri Ajay Maken, Union Minister of State for Youth Affairs & Sports, GOI

Chairperson, UPA

Shri Nitin Gadkari, President, BJP

Mr. Sitaram Yechury, CPI.

Dr.Syeda Hameed , Member , Planning Commission , GOI

Dr.Murli Manohar Joshi, Chairman , Parliamentary Accounts Committee , GOI.

12th Five Year Plan – DMAI


Image

Rajendra Pratap Gupta

President & Member

Board of Directors

March 09, 2012

Via e-mail / Speed-Post

Dr. Manmohan Singh,

Prime Minister

Government of India

Shri Ghulam Nabi Azad,

Union Minister for Health & Family Welfare

Government of India.

Subject: Strategic Considerations for Healthcare in the 12th five year plan

 

Dear Dr. Singh & Shri Ghulam Nabi Azad ji,

I am writing this note on behalf of DMAI – Disease Management Association of India.

Disease Management Association of India (DMAI – The Population Health Improvement Alliance) is formed by leaders from the Global Healthcare fraternity, to bring all the stake- holders of healthcare on one platform (Both the public & the Private sector). DMAI has been successful in establishing an intellectual pool of top healthcare leaders to become an enabler in building a robust healthcare system in India. India is on the verge of building its healthcare system, and it has a long way to go. DMAI is building the resource – knowledge pool to contribute & convert ‘Ideas’ into ‘Reality’ for healthcare in India. DMAI is the only not-for-profit organization focused on population health improvement in India.

Earlier in 2009, I have authored the comprehensive healthcare reforms agenda for India, and this has been appreciated by political and policy-making leadership at the highest level. Further, the healthcare reforms agenda  (detailed agenda is available at the DMAI website http://www.dmai.org.in/Healthcare_Reforms_Agenda.pdf) has been incorporated in the healthcare planning in the state of Chhattisgarh.

Further, DMAI has given inputs to various government bodies, as sought from time to time on:

Re-structuring of ICDS

NCD Policy

Re-structuring the 12th Five year plan for healthcare

Formation of NCHRH

Inputs in the high level UN summit for NCD’s (DMAI was an official invitee to the UN)

DMAI has raised important issues w.r.t. The Mental Health Act 2010, banning of Junk food in schools, reservations in airlines and railways for critically ill and in times of medical emergencies, radical changes in Jan Aushadhi scheme, healthcare reforms in J & K, Protocols and treatment guidelines for all major acute and chronic illnesses; besides other issues. Details available on www.dmai.org.in

12th five year plan is being talked of as the ‘Plan for Health’, and through this note, DMAI wishes to bring a few important issues before the policy makers for debate and appropriate action:

Quality of Healthcare: Last year, I was nominated to the five member Healthcare committee of the Quality Council of India. Since then, I have been discussing with all the stakeholders in healthcare, including the patient groups, about how to improve the quality of healthcare in India.

Action:  It must be made mandatory for all healthcare providers (Care Givers), to submit the Patient / treatment outcomes data e.g. for hospitals (including admissions, no. Of night stays, re-admissions, infection rates, deaths, referrals, etc.) to the government every year without fail. Also, getting similar data for doctors, clinicians etc. should also be looked at. This data could be maintained under the Quality Council of India (QCI) or an entity under QCI, funded jointly by the government and private players or, as an independent organization. This organization must analyze the data and post it on the website, so as to enable the patients to make an informed choice when it comes to choosing the doctors / hospitals or the caregivers. This will be the first step in bringing transparency in healthcare and a major boost to improving quality in healthcare. A hospital stay costs an average of $236 per day in India, $655 per day in France and an average of $3,949 per day in the US, according to a report — 2011 Comparative Price Report Medical and Hospital Fees by Country – released by the International Federation of Health Plans.  After paying USD 236 (Approximately Rs. 11328.00 / day (USD 1= INR 48), what does the patient get in return?  . We believe that by implementing this reporting by caregivers, the caregivers would work harder to improve their performance in terms of outcomes for treatment and, in a way, it will lead to ‘Pay for Performance’.  Patient would be able to make choices based on whosoever provides the best care!

Also, all the hospitals / care givers must ensure appropriate patient follow-up and feed back mechanism, and the government must devise an institutional mechanism to collect the data on success rate of treatments and examine the reasons for failure so that the quality of healthcare delivered can be improved.

This must be done by setting up the National Institute for Research in Healthcare Quality Improvement.

This institute must focus on coming out with annual reports on improving the quality of healthcare in all the states, as the healthcare issues vary from state to state. We have seen that recently, West Bengal has been home to dozens of child deaths in major government hospitals.

But as of now, there is no investigating body for healthcare to look into these issues, and the crime investigating agencies (Police) lack the necessary qualifications & skills to carry out any meaningful investigation and suggest remedial steps for such incidents. It is the time to correct this by setting a dedicated national body for such incidents.

USA has moved towards ACO’s (Accountable Care Organizations); and it is high time that India sets up the guidelines for all healthcare delivery organizations to become self-regulated ACO’s

Recently, DMAI was actively involved in doing the biggest Healthcare camp in Ajmer (the constituency of Shri Sachin Pilot), and examined over 50,000 (according to some media estimates, approximately 71,000 people). The people were given free diagnostic tests & medicines only due to active participation & support from the private sector. It is high time that the government acknowledges that the private sector has a pivotal role to play if the ‘Healthcare for all- Universal Healthcare’, has to move beyond ‘mike & paper’! Private sector has always shown commitment by providing resources for ‘pilots’ and ‘Free camps’, but we must not forget that, ‘Charity is as deep as the pocket’! It would be a win-win, if the government starts with launching the mass screening program with the private sector, re-launching the ‘Jan Aushadhi’ scheme with the private sector & implementing mass scale telemedicine / mHealth projects with the private sector

I was an invitee to the meeting called by the Hon’ble Health Minister /WHO on 23/ 24th August 2011 at Delhi, and was also involved in the writing of the document called ‘Delhi call to action’.  I recall, that the Hon’ble Minister made an announcement to screen 200 million people for diabetes and hypertension by March 2012. I have learned through reliable sources that this mass screening plan, that was to start with 100 districts was reduced to 10 districts and finally to slums of two districts, and the results were not encouraging! In a way, even 10 % of the target of 200 million (2 crores) has not been achieved. This reminds me of the Sir Joseph Bhore Committee report in 1946, which talked about Universal Healthcare.

Also of the National Health Policy (NHP) 1983, which talked about ‘Health for All’ by 2000 AD’.

Both these committees failed to deliver Universal Healthcare. So, essentially, even after 65 years, ‘Healthcare for all’ has just remained a ‘concept’ & a mere ‘talking point’.

In the current plan – 2012, we are again talking about the same thing ‘Healthcare for all’. This time, we have a high level committee and the wordings have changed to ‘Universal Healthcare’. Doubling of budgets for healthcare will not be able to address the healthcare problems facing the nation, till we ‘double our understanding’ of the real issues and the solutions and give up the parochial approach to remedy the ills in our system!

It is clear that the government lacks an execution plan, and also that; ‘execution’ has never been the forte of the government. It is high time that government puts “PPPr”- Private Public Performance based rewards partnership in place like the NHAI and then only releases the budget for the 12th five-year plan.

It is time to learn from what you did in UID! A person from the private sector has already issued 30 million Aadhaar cards, and this has already become the biggest biometric program in the world. Can we not learn from UID and implement in MOHFW ?

We need a ‘Professional’ CIIO (Chief Innovation & Information Officer) in the Ministry of Health, who will bring the necessary capabilities in the ministry to make a difference in the ‘Health for All’.

Free insurance & Free medicines: This scheme is a ‘Killer Combination’.  ‘Social healthcare’ has failed miserably in the western world, and we seem to have not picked up the lessons but are hell bent on ‘Importing failures’ of the west into the Indian healthcare system. As I mentioned in the 2009- ‘Healthcare reforms agenda’, I will re-iterate that we need a ‘Co-pay’ model for healthcare delivery.  Except the BPL families, all others must have’Co-Pay’ component in the healthcare services even if it is a token of 5-10 % of the total healthcare cost borne by the government. Co-Pay must go up with the income slabs!

Rajiv Aarogyashree scheme (highly publicized scheme of Andhra Pradesh), is now widely talked of as a ‘failure’, and the government is not in a position to pay the empanelled facilities for the ‘free treatment’ that has been a part of the popular scheme

It is time to re-look at ‘Free universal healthcare schemes’. If the government examines the free healthcare schemes currently offered all over the world, it would think twice about free healthcare!.

Free medicines scheme: During my visits to Rajasthan (medicines are given free in Rajasthan government hospitals), I was made to re-think about this scheme

This scheme has created a peculiar situation for doctors.  Doctors are told that the family member is suffering from cold, cough or backache, and s/he is asked to give the medicine!

When the doctors request to examine the patient as to check if it is dry cough, TB induced cough etc., the response that the family members give is, ‘ When the medicines are provided free by the government, then why do you ask so many questions?

If the doctor refuses to give medicines, political pressure is applied and the doctors are harassed! Doctors have been reduced to ‘compounders’, and are just dispensing medicines rather than treating patients, because of the ‘free medicine scheme’!  Even in the USA, we have seen scams where ‘dummy patients’ were created under Medicaid, and reimbursements taken from the government in the name of ‘diabetic patients’. India will witness large-scale organized frauds if such a scheme is rolled out without adequate checks and controls.

When it comes to medicines, I must request the government to monitor the pharma industry closely, as the customer is not getting the benefit of ‘low prices’ (read as- schemes that are offered by the industry to the distributors).  Just for the sake of information, I am quoting two examples:

Panegra is available at an MRP of Rs. 124.00 and the scheme offered by the manufacturing company is- seven strips free on purchase of one strip! Still the end consumer buys the medicine on MRP!  The manufacturer distributor – retailer nexus swallows the entire margin.

Another example is that of Cifran, priced at Rs.58.80 and the scheme offered by the manufacturing company is – one strip free on buying two strips. But, such benefits are never passed on to the ignorant end customer- patient. Similarly, 1000’s of products are available with such ‘deals’ but the patient does not get the benefit.

Government must take decisive action against such pharma companies. The two companies quoted here are just for reference and most of the companies are indulging in these practices

Also, the government must give a big push for mobile healthcare (mHealth & Telemedicine). CDAC Mohali (a government body) has developed a great application for telemedicine, and DMAI used that service during the mega healthcare camp at Ajmer, in collaboration with PGI, Chandigarh. It is time to promote such institutes and organizations.

May be, it would be worth having a joint working group between the ‘Ministry of Communications & IT’ and ‘Ministry of Health & Family Welfare’, to explore the commercially deployable models of telemedicine & mHealth

It is the right time to train all our nurses & pharmacists in healthcare counseling through online training modules and create a special cadre of healthcare counselors for chronic diseases.

It is the right time to set the Patient Charter for Healthcare, which includes the patient’s rights and responsibilities. DMAI is driving an initiative to come out with a ‘Patient Charter’ under the leadership of Dr.Aniruddha Malpani.

These changes are required if we wish to make an impact on the healthcare delivery system.

Currently, there is a big gap between ground realities, policy formulation & execution framework. We need radical changes in our thinking to create an ‘Inclusive Healthcare Ecosystem’. It is better that immediate steps are taken to correct the loopholes so that Healthcare for all can become a reality without compromising on the quality of care.

DMAI would be willing to volunteer with its knowledge pool and resources should the policy makers need the same

Yours in good health

 Rajendra Pratap Gupta

CC:

Mrs.Sonia Gandhi

Shri Nitin Gadkari

Dr.Manmohan Singh,

Dr.Murli Manohar Joshi, Chairman, Parliamentary Accounts Committee

Minister for Communication & IT, GOI

Montek Singh Ahluwalia

Dr.Syeda Hameed.

Shri L.K.Advani

Smt. Sushma Swaraj

Shri Sudip Bandyopadhyay

Sam Pitroda

Rahul Gandhi

Sitaram Yechury

Secy, Health & Family Welfare, GOI

DGHS, MOHFW,GOI.

Dr. K. Srinath Reddy

Dr.Girdhar Gyani, QCI.

Dr.V.K. Singh, QCI

Board of Directors – DMAI